Public Engagement and Multi Use Platform on Oinousses and Chios

By SalM on October 15, 2020 in MUSICA News Articles, Press Release

As part of the MUSICA Project activities, several workshops are planned for key MUSICA stakeholders covering Multi Use Platform (MUP) and Smart Island topics. Yesterday, on the islands of Oinousses and Chios, it was our first opportunity to share MUSICA’s aims and progress with the public.


What did we learn yesterday?


This event informed islanders about how renewable energy, desalination and aquaculture can work together on one multiple-use platform. At the same time, guided activities gave participants a forum to discuss these topics; ask questions from MUSICA leadership; present ideas and concerns.

Input from community representatives in Chios and Oinousses—along with local authority, industry and research institutions—is vital to realising MUSICA’s ambitions to demonstrate how the needs of small islands everywhere (clean energy, fresh water, food, and employment) can be addressed through renewable technology using local resources. The event’s key purpose was to build links between different stakeholders and involve local people at an early stage in the Project.

What we learn from each other is shared on our website where the discussion can continue. Feedback helps us create follow-on workshops that will bring these same groups together to report on MUSICA progress and provide education and training around its benefits.


SINN Power: How to harvest energy from the different renewable energy technologies?



Multi-Use platform construction phase to pilot demo stages



What is the role of NeoDyne in the MUSICA Project? – Technical aspects



Why is AQUACULTURE such an important aspect of MUSICA – ZOE GLETCHER, AQUABIOTECH Group


Find also AquaBioTech presentation here.


Multi-Use of Space supports the sustainable use of the sea – HWU



Why is community involvement important? – ICoRSA



From Multi-Use of Space to Multi-Use Platform


Download the presentation here

Participants’ Mentimeter


Find out more about Participants’ Mentimeter

 

For further information please contact Graham Lynch (Project Dissemination & Communications Officer) at grahamlynch@ucc.ie.

Online session: What are the benefits of the Multi-Use Platform for the Chios Municipality?

By SalM on October 13, 2020 in MUSICA News Articles

Πώς θα αποκτήσετε περισσότερη ηλεκτρική ενέργεια, πόσιμο νερό και μια ιχθυοκαλλιέργεια;

Η Πλατφόρμα Πολλαπλών Χρήσεων προσφέρει λύσεις για την παροχή καθαρής ηλεκτρικής ενέργειας και πολλά άλλα!

Να η ευκαιρία να μοιραστείτε τις απόψεις σας, καθώς ένα πραγματικό ενεργειακό έργο αναπτύσσεται.

Χίος, 14 Οκτωβρίου 2020, Διαδικτυακό σεμινάριο

https://zoom.us/j/97316837584
Meeting ID: 973 1683 7584

——-

Οι εταίροι του ευρωπαϊκού έργου MUSICA εργάζονται για την ανάπτυξη «λύσης μιας στάσης» (one-stop solution) σε μια Πλατφόρμα Πολλαπλών Χρήσεων που θα παράγει ηλεκτρική ενέργεια και νερό χρησιμοποιώντας την ενέργεια από τρεις ανανεώσιμες πηγές: τον άνεμο, τον ήλιο και τα κύματα. Η ποσότητα νερού της μονάδας αφαλάτωσης της πλατφόρμας, θα είναι ικανή να καλύψει τις ανάγκες 800 ατόμων. Λίγο πιο δίπλα θα λειτουργεί μία ιχθυοκαλλιέργεια που θα τροφοδοτείται απευθείας με την πράσινη ενέργεια που θα παράγεται στην πλατφόρμα.

Θέλετε να μάθετε πώς αυτό το 5ετές έργο μπορεί να επηρεάσει τις κοινότητες της Χίου και των Οινουσσών; Ποιες είναι οι προκλήσεις σχεδιασμού; Ποιοί θα ωφεληθούν από το έργο; Μήπως εσύ?

Για να ενημερώνεστε από τους εταίρους του MUSICA για την πρόοδο του έργου, να ανταλλάσσουμε ιδέες και να συνεχίσουμε τη δράση για βιώσιμες λύσεις παντού, απλώς εγγραφείτε στις δημόσιες συζητήσεις μας.

https://zoom.us/j/97316837584
Meeting ID: 973 1683 7584


How to get more electricity, fresh water and a fish farm?
Multi-Use Platforms offer clean energy supply solutions and much more!

Here’s your chance to share your views as a real energy project develops.

Chios, 14 October 2020, Online Webinar

————–

The EU’s MUSICA Project partners are working to develop a one-stop solution in a Multi-Use Platform that will produce electricity and fresh water using renewable power from the wind and waves. The floating platform will provide enough desalinated water to meet the needs of 800 people. A remote fish farm will operate directly from the green energy produced.

Do you want to know how this 5-year project might influence the communities of Chios and Oinousses? What the design challenges are? Who stands to benefit? Do you?

Chios, Join us online!

To learn from MUSICA partners about our progress, exchange ideas and continue the action for sustainable solutions everywhere, simply register for our public discussions in Chios.

The event will be held online via zoom:
https://zoom.us/j/97316837584
Meeting ID: 973 1683 7584

Public Discussion: How to get more electricity, fresh water and a fish farm on Oinousses

By SalM on October 12, 2020 in MUSICA News Articles


Πώς θα αποκτήσετε περισσότερη ηλεκτρική ενέργεια, πόσιμο νερό και μια ιχθυοκαλλιέργεια;

Η Πλατφόρμα Πολλαπλών Χρήσεων προσφέρει λύσεις για την παροχή καθαρής ηλεκτρικής ενέργειας και πολλά άλλα!

Να η ευκαιρία να μοιραστείτε τις απόψεις σας, καθώς ένα πραγματικό ενεργειακό έργο αναπτύσσεται.

Οινούσσες, 14 Οκτωβρίου 2020, Δημαρχείο (Ένωση Φίλων Οινουσών)

——-

Οι εταίροι του ευρωπαϊκού έργου MUSICA εργάζονται για την ανάπτυξη «λύσης μιας στάσης» (one-stop solution) σε μια Πλατφόρμα Πολλαπλών Χρήσεων που θα παράγει ηλεκτρική ενέργεια και νερό χρησιμοποιώντας την ενέργεια από τρεις ανανεώσιμες πηγές: τον άνεμο, τον ήλιο και τα κύματα. Η ποσότητα νερού της μονάδας αφαλάτωσης της πλατφόρμας, θα είναι ικανή να καλύψει τις ανάγκες 800 ατόμων. Λίγο πιο δίπλα θα λειτουργεί μία ιχθυοκαλλιέργεια που θα τροφοδοτείται απευθείας με την πράσινη ενέργεια που θα παράγεται στην πλατφόρμα.

Θέλετε να μάθετε πώς αυτό το 5ετές έργο μπορεί να επηρεάσει τις κοινότητες της Χίου και των Οινουσσών; Ποιες είναι οι προκλήσεις σχεδιασμού; Ποιοί θα ωφεληθούν από το έργο; Μήπως εσύ?

10:30 – 13:00 – Συνεδρία: Πώς η πλατφόρμα πολλαπλών χρήσεων θα επηρεάσει την κοινότητα των Οινουσσών, τους πολίτες, τους ιχθυοκαλλιεργητές; Ποια είναι τα οφέλη για εσάς – Διαδραστικό εργαστήριο με νησιώτες – απογευματινή συνεδρία

Για να ενημερώνεστε από τους εταίρους του MUSICA για την πρόοδο του έργου, να ανταλλάσσουμε ιδέες και να συνεχίσουμε τη δράση για βιώσιμες λύσεις παντού, απλώς εγγραφείτε στις δημόσιες συζητήσεις μας.

Oinousses Event Announcement


How to get more electricity, fresh water and a fish farm?

Multi-Use Platforms offer clean energy supply solutions and much more!

Here’s your chance to share your views as a real energy project develops.

Oinousses, 14 October 2020,  Oinousses at City Council Hall (Οinousses Friends Association)
———-

The EU’s MUSICA Project partners are working to develop a one-stop solution in a Multi-Use Platform that will produce electricity and fresh water using renewable power from the wind and waves. The floating platform will provide enough desalinated water to meet the needs of 800 people. A remote fish farm will operate directly from the green energy produced.

Do you want to know how this 5-year project might influence the communities of Chios and Oinousses? What the design challenges are? Who stands to benefit? Do you?

  • Event: A solution for the electricity shortage and lack of freshwater: Multi-Use Platform on Oinousses

    • 10:30 -12:00 – Session 1: How Multi-Use platform will influence on Oinousses community, citizens, fish farmers? What are the benefits for you – Interactive workshop with islanders
    • 12:00 – 13:00 – Interactive workshop with islanders

    Hall capacity with COVID-measures is around 50persons.

Join us! Oinousess, 14 October 2020.

To learn from MUSICA partners about our progress, exchange ideas and continue the action for sustainable solutions everywhere, simply register for our public discussions.

Turning the page on the age of oil

By SalM on October 11, 2020 in Other News Articles

Governments have a choice: stimulate fossil fuel industries or invest in a more resilient recovery, powered by renewable energy.  This is a once in a generation chance, write Achim Steiner and Francesco La Camera.

Achim Steiner is Administrator of the United Nations Development Programme; Francesco La Camera is Director General of the International Renewable Energy Agency 

April was a difficult month for oil. Faced with an abrupt drop in demand caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, some producers – quite literally – have nowhere left to put it. Reports have emerged of a flotilla of supertankers idling at sea, with at least 160 million barrels of crude in their vast holds. The drop in the price of oil was so precipitous that for a moment — for the first time in history — a loaf of bread was more expensive than a barrel of the ‘black gold’.

With more than half of humanity on lockdown during this pandemic, a decline in energy demand was inevitable. Air traffic was down 60% and road traffic by nearly 50% by the end of the first quarter of 2020. Global demand for coal is projected to fall by 8% in 2020. At some point soon, however, societies and economies will get back to work. The danger is that they will get ‘back to normal’. ‘Normal’ was a world steeped in the climate crisis, riddled with inequalities, with entire economies pegged to volatile oil prices, and seven million people dying each year from polluted air.

As governments determine how to invest tax-payers’ money in their social and economic recovery from this pandemic, they have a choice to make: stimulate fossil fuel industries — a short-term band-aid that will reinforce the collision course with nature — or invest in the future: in a more resilient recovery, powered by renewable energy. Energy contributes 73% of global emissions. This is a once in a generation chance to set things straight. And there are blueprints to draw from.

Consider the Middle East and North Africa, which saw a ten-fold increase in solar and wind power capacities in the past decade, and a doubling of capacities in the past two years alone. This was by design, not by accident, aided by political decisions and market-based mechanisms that lowered solar costs, reformed subsidies, and created dedicated government institutions and renewable energy development zones, creating the potential for more jobs and more stable economic growth in the region.

Decarbonization is not a painless prospect; oil exporting countries in Africa, for example, depend on hydrocarbon proceeds to balance their books. Angola and Nigeria, who derive 90 percent of export earnings and more than two-thirds of government revenue from oil sales, could lose up to US $65 billion in oil-related incomes as a result of falling oil prices exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic. Oil-importing countries, particularly Least Developed Countries and Small Island Developing States, may experience a short-term benefit from lower oil prices, but a COVID-19-induced recession will damage their social and economic prospects and threatens to push millions of people back into poverty.

This illustrates why an extended debt standstill for all vulnerable countries, as called for by the United Nations, is so important. Countries need to flatten their debt curve to create fiscal space for the COVID-19 response. Recovery measures must simultaneously respond to the pandemic and focus on building back better. Therefore, even as this pandemic is unfolding, here are five energy choices decision-makers should consider:

Invest in renewable energy as the economical choice: Taking health and education benefits into account, the savings accrued by decarbonizing the global economy by 2050 would be eight times the cost, according to new research from the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA), and the socio-economic gains would be massive. Cumulative global GDP would grow by USD 98 trillion above business-as-usual between now and 2050 and renewable energy jobs would quadruple to 42 million. Transitioning to renewables does not mean turning off the fossil-fuel tap overnight. But for a continent such as Africa, where necessary electricity-generating infrastructure is yet to be built, the cost per kWh of renewable energy could be the most effective option – not a burden, therefore, but a net benefit. Policymakers should keep this positive energy horizon firmly in sight in designing stimulus packages.

Use climate agreements as part of the agenda for recovery: As part of the Paris international climate change agreement, nearly every country in the world developed a Nationally Determined Contribution (NDC) – a plan to reduce emissions and increase resilience to climate impacts. Right now, as we help countries to prepare, respond and recover in the face of COVID-19, the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), IRENA and other partners are simultaneously working with 110 countries through our Climate Promise to deliver on these plans. NDCs offer a ready-made, publicly backed framework of solutions to help countries find a path through this pandemic – with international partners and financing already committed to support.

Design bailouts that work for the environment: Investing to expand the fossil fuel supply infrastructure is short-termism. Some countries are already using COVID-bailouts to design a greener future. The Austrian government, for example, made state aid for Austrian Airlines conditional on support to climate policy targets. All stimulus and recovery packages have the same potential to address the current economic downturn and climate crisis simultaneously.


To read the full article please follow the link below to the EurActiv website

Turning the page on the age of oil

Renewables Increasingly Beat Even Cheapest Coal Competitors on Cost

By SalM on October 11, 2020 in Other News Articles

Competitive power generation costs make investment in renewables highly attractive as countries target economic recovery from COVID-19, new IRENA report finds.

Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, 2 June 2020 — Renewable power is increasingly cheaper than any new electricity capacity based on fossil fuels, a new report by the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA) published today finds. Renewable Power Generation Costs in 2019 shows that more than half of the renewable capacity added in 2019 achieved lower power costs than the cheapest new coal plants.

The report highlights that new renewable power generation projects now increasingly undercut existing coal-fired plants. On average, new solar photovoltaic (PV) and onshore wind power cost less than keeping many existing coal plants in operation, and auction results show this trend accelerating – reinforcing the case to phase-out coal entirely. Next year, up to 1 200 gigawatts (GW) of existing coal capacity could cost more to operate than the cost of new utility-scale solar PV, the report shows.

Replacing the costliest 500 GW of coal with solar PV and onshore wind next year would cut power system costs by up to USD 23 billion every year and reduce annual emissions by around 1.8 gigatons (Gt) of carbon dioxide (CO2), equivalent to 5% of total global CO2 emissions in 2019. It would also yield an investment stimulus of USD 940 billion, which is equal to around 1% of global GDP.

“We have reached an important turning point in the energy transition. The case for new and much of the existing coal power generation, is both environmentally and economically unjustifiable,” said Francesco La Camera, Director-General of IRENA. “Renewable energy is increasingly the cheapest source of new electricity, offering tremendous potential to stimulate the global economy and get people back to work. Renewable investments are stable, cost-effective and attractive offering consistent and predictable returns while delivering benefits to the wider economy.

“A global recovery strategy must be a green strategy,” La Camera added. “Renewables offer a way to align short-term policy action with medium- and long-term energy and climate goals. Renewables must be the backbone of national efforts to restart economies in the wake of the COVID-19 outbreak. With the right policies in place, falling renewable power costs, can shift markets and contribute greatly towards a green recovery.”

Renewable electricity costs have fallen sharply over the past decade, driven by improving technologies, economies of scale, increasingly competitive supply chains and growing developer experience. Since 2010, utility-scale solar PV power has shown the sharpest cost decline at 82%, followed by concentrating solar power (CSP) at 47%, onshore wind at 39% and offshore wind at 29%.

Costs for solar and wind power technologies also continued to fall year-on-year. Electricity costs from utility-scale solar PV fell 13% in 2019, reaching a global average of 6.8 cents (USD 0.068) per kilowatt-hour (kWh). Onshore and offshore wind both declined about 9%, reaching USD 0.053/kWh and USD 0.115/kWh, respectively.


To read the full article please follow the link to the original source, IRENA Website.

https://www.irena.org/newsroom/pressreleases/2020/Jun/Renewables-Increasingly-Beat-Even-Cheapest-Coal-Competitors-on-Cost

Link to the full report below.

https://www.irena.org/publications/2020/Jun/Renewable-Power-Costs-in-2019

Multi-Use platform construction phase to pilot demo stages

By SalM on October 10, 2020 in MUSICA News Articles, Press Release

In crowded seas such as those around the European Union – including, for example, the Baltic Sea, the North Sea and the Mediterranean – pressures on the environment are building and space is at a premium. One idea that has been put forward to make more efficient use of the seas and minimise the footprint of human activities is offshore platforms that combine multiple uses. n principle, platforms offer efficiencies, such as maximising the amount of energy generated from one platform if different energy generation methods are used, while minimising the amount of space taken up and saving on operational and maintenance costs.

Ayoze Castro, Innovation Manager at PLOCAN talks about it’s role in the development of the Multi-Use Platform and MUSICA project. PLOCAN was created in 2007 as a public consortium between National Government of  Spain and regional Government of Canary Islands. It has been included as part of Spanish network of unique technical infrastructure in order to exploit certain competitive advantages of the region. The final goal is to be closer to the companies and the productive market to try to support innovation requirements rather than to produce basic research.

PLOCAN has land-based and naval(sea)-based facilities to support development in marine & maritime sectors. Main facility includes a dedicated marine test site, fixed off shore platform acting as ocean laboratory and coastal open ocean observatory. With this main structures they offer natural services of hosting new prototypes and technologies for conducting validation and demonstration test in real environment. PLOCAN is a governmental body that facilitates and accelerates all the operations and logistics of construction and deployment of prototypes. In particular speeding up the authorizations and permits. PLOCAN offers professional capacities with land-based facilities, specialized training programs and robust network to ensure bilateral communication between land and sea.

About the partner

The Oceanic Platform of the Canary Islands (PLOCAN) is a Research Infrastructure (RI) labeled by the ICTS (Unique Scientific and Technological Infrastructure) Spanish National Roadmap, co-funded by the Ministry of Science, Innovation and Universities of the Spanish government and the Canary Islands government and by the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF) under the Operational Programme of the Canary Islands. PLOCAN is a multipurpose technical-scientific service infrastructure that provides support for research, technological development and innovation in the marine and maritime sectors, available to public and private users. PLOCAN offers both onshore and offshore experimental facilities and laboratories, operational throughout the whole year thanks to the Canary Islands excellent climatic conditions. PLOCAN also brings a broad experience in large national and EU marine/maritime projects.

 

For further information please contact Graham Lynch (Project Dissemination & Communications Officer) at grahamlynch@ucc.ie.

Boris Johnson: Wind Farms Could Power Every Home by 2030

By SalM on October 6, 2020 in Other News Articles

Offshore wind farms will generate enough electricity to power every home in the UK within a decade, Boris Johnson will pledge later.

Speaking at Conservative party conference, the PM will announce £160m to upgrade ports and factories for building turbines to help the country “build back greener”.

The plan aims to create 2,000 jobs in construction and support 60,000 more.

He will say the UK is to become “the world leader in clean wind energy”.

“Your kettle, your washing machine, your cooker, your heating, your plug-in electric vehicle – the whole lot of them will get their juice cleanly and without guilt from the breezes that blow around these islands,” he will say.

Mr Johnson’s speech comes after he made a pledge at a UN biodiversity summit in New York to protect 30% of UK land for nature as a “boost for biodiversity”.

The scheme will see the money invested into manufacturing in Teesside and Humber in northern England, as well as sites in Scotland and Wales.

Mr Johnson said the government was raising its target for offshore wind power capacity by 2030 from 30 gigawatts to 40 gigawatts.

The commitments are the first stage of a 10-point plan for a “green industrial revolution” from the government, with No 10 promising the rest of the details later this year to “accelerate our progress towards net zero emissions by 2050”.

The net zero target means greenhouse gas emissions would be dramatically slashed and any remaining emissions offset, neutralising environmental impacts and slowing climate change.

Mr Johnson’s speech comes amid a “fractious” mood on the Conservative backbenches about his handling of the Covid-19 crisis, BBC political editor Laura Kuenssberg says.

She said the occasion could provide the prime minister with an opportunity to sell his vision of the country post-pandemic to party members.

But she added this year’s speech – to be delivered virtually without a live audience – would not allow him to plug into the energy of a crowd as he normally would.


To read the full article follow the link posted below to the BBC Website.

https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-politics-54421489

Green Hydrogen From Renewables Could Become Cheapest Transformative Fuel

By SalM on October 4, 2020 in Other News Articles

“Green hydrogen” made with wind and solar electricity could become the cheapest form of what the Australian government has described as a “transformative fuel” much faster than expected, analysts believe.

Chinese manufacturers have reported making systems to create hydrogen with renewable energy for up to 80% less than official Australian estimates from just two years ago.

Energy analysts said it suggested green hydrogen was likely to leapfrog hydrogen made with gas and coal as the most cost-effective form of the energy before the end of the decade, and by the time an industry could be developed at scale.

The government has nominated “clean hydrogen” as a priority low-emissions technology that could eventually help replace fossil fuels in transport, electricity and in industrial processes as the world moves to cut greenhouse gas emissions. But it has not defined what “clean hydrogen” would mean in terms of emissions.

Its recent low-emissions technology statement forecast the cheapest way to produce it in the short-term might be to use gas or “coal gasification” with carbon capture and storage (CCS). It said production methods using renewable energy would become cheaper as demand grew.

But an analysis by BloombergNEF has found electrolysers used in China could already be as little as a fifth of the cost estimated in a CSIRO roadmap released in 2018, which has been used as the basis for government estimates. The consultancy suggested green hydrogen could cost less than $2 a kilogram – the “stretch goal” nominated by Angus Taylor, the energy and emissions reduction minister, at which the fuel would become competitive with existing technologies – before 2030.

“We think electrolysers can get much cheaper much sooner than most expect,” said Kobad Bhavnagri, BloombergNEF’s Sydney-based global head of industrial decarbonisation.

“The way we see it is there is very little demand for hydrogen from fossil fuels with CCS. It doesn’t fit the scale-up model for an emerging industry.”

The International Renewable Energy Agency last year also acknowledged in a report last year that Chinese manufacturers had claimed electrolysers were already available for a cost that had been considered a best-case scenario for 2040.

The government estimates hydrogen could create more than 8,000 jobs and generate about $11bn a year in GDP by 2050. Major economic powers including Germany and Japan are eyeing Australia as a potential source of hydrogen as the world moves away from fossil fuels, in line with the goals of the Paris agreement.

Germany has dedicated more than A$15bn of Covid-19 stimulus spending to developing a domestic hydrogen industry, and has agreed with Australia to undertake a joint feasibility study into its potential as an energy source. The European Commission recently launched a strategy that positions green hydrogen as central to the continent’s goal to reach “climate neutrality” – net zero emissions – by 2050.

In Australia, the most ambitious proposal to date is for what is known as the Asian Renewable Energy Hub. Planned for the Pilbara, its scale is extraordinary: 1,600 large wind turbines and a 78 sq km array of solar panels working to power 14 gigawatts of hydrogen electrolysers.

Speaking at an online summit hosted by the Smart Energy Council this week, the hub’s executive director, Alex Hewitt, said the scale of the proposed development – which he described as the world’s largest power plant – meant it could create green hydrogen for less than the government’s benchmark of $2 a kilogram. “That’s the beauty of very intense, massive, properly correlated renewable energy,” he said.

The hub plans to largely use the hydrogen to create “green ammonia”, effectively replacing gas in the ammonia production process. Hewitt said ammonia was “a great way to ship hydrogen” as transporting it as a liquid was likely to be both logistically challenging and much more expensive.

The Greens leader, Adam Bandt, has written to the CSIRO asking it to update its 2018 analysis on the basis that recent contract prices for green hydrogen are already about 50% less than the best-case scenario the science agency had projected for 2025.

Bandt said CSIRO was not at fault – the green hydrogen industry has developed rapidly – but he was concerned the government would neglect the zero emissions option in its plan in favour of fossil fuels and miss economic opportunities if forecasts were not updated.

“With green hydrogen, Australia can export our sunlight,” Bandt said. “There is no point having a technology roadmap if the figures are all wrong. Up-to-date estimates are critical to making policies that benefit users and support the job-creating industries of the future.”

A spokesperson for Taylor responded: “Why would the government listen to Adam Bandt over CSIRO and the chief scientist?”

Green hydrogen is created by using an electrolyser to run an electrical current through water, separating it into hydrogen and oxygen. Gas is used to make hydrogen through a different process involving high-pressure steam and a catalyst such as nickel, known as steam-methane reforming. One of its by-products is carbon dioxide, which is either released into the atmosphere or – under the government’s proposal – captured and pumped underground.

The hope is that hydrogen will prove an emissions-free alternative to coal and gas in industries that operate at incredibly high temperatures. While estimates about the scale of a future industry vary significantly, experts believe it is likely to be more cost effective if used to help create local green industries, such as emissions-free steel, rather than converted into liquid form, as gas is, before it is exported.

Bloomberg NEF projected that green hydrogen would cost US$1.33 a kilogram by 2030, falling to about $0.76 a kilogram by 2050.

By comparison, it suggested hydrogen created using gas with CCS was likely to cost about $1.92 a kilogram at both dates assuming gas prices stayed cheaper than it had been in recent years, and using coal with CCS would cost US$2.51 a kilogram.

Alan Finkel, the chief scientist and head of the council advising the government on its technology roadmap, has recommended a “certificate of origin” be attached to every kilogram sold that listed how much CO2 had been emitted in its creation.

In an interview with the ABC, he said no country would buy hydrogen that was not “clean”, as the industry was being developed specifically as a replacement for fossil fuels, and some countries had indicated that included creating it using fossil fuels and CCS.

But, he said: “I think realistically the scale of hydrogen made from solar and wind is going to precede any other source.”


This article was taken from The Guardian. Please follow the link posted below to the original source

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2020/oct/03/green-hydrogen-from-renewables-could-become-cheapest-transformative-fuel-within-a-decade

Ulstein Designs Hydrogen Hybrid Wind Turbine Installation Vessel

By SalM on October 2, 2020 in Other News Articles

According to Ulstein, the jack-up can operate 75 per cent of the time in zero-emission mode. Using readily available technology, the additional cost is limited to less than five per cent of the total CAPEX, the company said.

Most new jack-up designs are featuring a battery hybrid system in addition to diesel gen sets, with a future option for a hydrogen-powered fuel cell system.

A high-power battery energy storage system (BESS), however, comes with downsides such as heavy weight and high cost. That is not beneficial for a WTIV design, where weight savings are essential for minimizing elevated weight and optimising the variable deck load, Ulstein said.

”We have carefully analysed the operational cycle of WTIVs and looked at the power demand in the various modes of operations,” said Ko Stroo, Product Manager at Ulstein.

”This analysis showed that ca. 75% of its time, a WTIV is in jacked-up position performing crane operations. Using a combination of a hydrogen fuel cell system and a relatively small battery energy storage system (BESS) is then sufficient to meet the overall power demand on board and crane peak loads.”

Source: Ulstein

This is Ulstein’s second hydrogen hybrid vessel design following the SX190 construction support ship.

”The same design philosophy as on our first hydrogen powered SX190 design, resulted in a much more attractive business case when applied to a turbine installation vessel,” said Edwin van Leeuwen, managing director of Ulstein’s Rotterdam design office.

The hydrogen hybrid system of the ULSTEIN J102 design has been developed in such a way, that future developments in hydrogen technology can easily be fitted into the vessel without major modifications, Ulstein said.

”The limited availability of hydrogen bunker infrastructure in ports is often seen as a major hurdle. With our modular storage lay-out, we want to break the chicken and egg dilemma,” said Stroo.

”It creates flexibility to operate the vessel worldwide, even when bunker infrastructure is not yet present.”


This article was written by Adnan Duraković and it was taken from the OffShoreWind website. Click on the link below to the original article

https://www.offshorewind.biz/2020/10/02/ulstein-designs-hydrogen-hybrid-wind-turbine-installation-vessel/

Eight Baltic Sea Countries Ink Offshore Wind Pact

By SalM on October 1, 2020 in Other News Articles

Denmark, Estonia, Finland, Germany, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, and Sweden have signed a joint declaration to cooperate on and accelerate the build-out of offshore wind projects in the Baltic Sea.

High-level representatives of the eight Baltic Sea countries and the European Commission signed the declaration on 30 September at an offshore wind conference in Szczecin, Poland, hosted by the Polish Wind Energy Association (PSEW).

The declaration states that offshore wind energy production is essential in reaching national and international climate and energy targets.

The aim of the collaboration will be to strengthen the political, economic and technological integration of the region through intensified joint work in the field of offshore wind.

The signatories agreed that the development of commercially viable offshore wind projects in the Baltic Sea should be sped up.

Furthermore, the declaration states that the parties will work together to ensure a level playing field for investors in offshore wind and market access.

The countries have also jointly committed to foster mutual collaboration in the context of the Baltic Energy Market Interconnection Plan (BEMIP), with hybrid offshore wind projects, smart grids, energy system integration and digitalization to be among the focus points of this cross-border collaboration.

The BEMIP High-level Group is now tasked to operationalize the Baltic Sea Offshore Wind Declaration. The group will draft a work programme for offshore wind development in the Baltic Sea that takes national policies set out in the National Energy and Climate Plans as well as EU policy developments into account. The presentation of this programme is planned for the first half of 2021, according to WindEurope.

“Today, the message is doubly positive for the whole region. First, we agreed to cooperate in the development of offshore wind between the countries of the Baltic region. Secondly, I am pleased that the Baltic Energy Market Interconnection Plan (BEMIP) has gained new momentum today, as this platform has been chosen for faster and more efficient cooperation in this area. It is gratifying that we are naturally moving from the integration of connections and markets to the development of offshore wind, because without this type of energy, a climate-neutral economy is simply impossible”, said Žygimantas Vaičiūnas, Lithuania’s Minister of Energy.

The eight countries will also develop coordinated approaches to maritime planning, taking into account other uses of the sea space and environmental protection.


This article was taken from the OffShoreBiz website. Follow the link to the original article

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